Immigration Executive Order Synthesis

My main topic is very broad as it affects the whole world but can be narrowed down to a few bullet points. President Donald J. Trump set an executive order in place that  essentially  would vet anyone coming into the United States, banned all Syrian refugees trying to enter, blocked immigrants coming from seven majority Muslim countries :Iran, Iraq,Libya,Yemen,Syria,Somalia, and Sudan, and also cause major issues for those with legal means of entering the U.S such as study abroad students and those with legal visas or green cards.

Liam Stacks covers social,political, and breaking news. He speaks Arabic fluently and has worked as a Middle East reporter for seven years talking about the Arab community and all that comes with it. He know writes articles for the New York Times where I stumbled on his immigration piece. It is titled Trump’s Executive Order On Immigration: What we know and what we Don’t”. The title very much stays true to exactly what his article is about and is very easy to read through. It starts with a little background on who the ban affects, it lists the seven countries I knew were affected again and also confirms that people with legal means faced consequences stating ” The immigration ban unleashed chaos on the immigration system and in airports in the United States and overseas,..” The article also gives readers the ability to look at the full text of the Presidents actual order for those who want to interpret it for themselves. I tried to read the real text by myself and got a bit confused so I am very happy Stacks summarizes the main points for me to get a better understanding of the topic. The article then goes on to have two sections, things we know about the topic, and things we do not yet know about the ban. Stacks goes on to tell us the time and date the ban was signed and went into affect. He talks about all the people that were detained at airports trying to renter the U.S immediately following the order signing. He goes on to talk about the protests and riots that emerged as word got about this order. Stacks is quick to add about a federal judge who was able to block a part of the ban and others followed soon after. This part helps my research because it shows there are ways to reverse the Presidents power. It also shows me that the President is not keen to those who oppose him as “Mr.Trump fired Ms. Yates just hours after she defied him”. His article also estimates how many people would be affected right after the ban was signed. Stacks does not have a lot of information under the “What we do not know yet” subtopic besides that we do not know how different airport officials will be complying with this ban.The next article was a bit different. It was written by Scott Clement of The Washington Times, who works as their polling manager. This article titled “President Trump is on shaky ground with his new immigration order” is filled with stats so it differs from the first right off the bat. The article starts off with a poll that was done in January on whether to deport illegal immigrants. In march 2016 another poll was conducted on whether to deport 11 million immigrants living in the U.S, this poll had the opposite results of the first.The issue arises when the numbers prove that illegal immigrants do not or do commit the same amount of crimes as those with legal means of living here. The article ends with talking about how many people did not agree with Trump but agree with him more than Hillary Clinton.

 

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Immigration ban executive order

On January 27th, 2017, president Donald Trump signed an executive order that essentially banned all Syrian refugees from entry into the United States. Along with that statement, it also has an extreme vetting process that immigrants would have to go through. The issue arises when realizing that this executive order targets mainly Seven countries; Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen, and Somalia, all of which are majority Muslim countries. Much like the election this ban has caused a divide in the U.S with some being opposed to the idea while others being all for it. The U.S today is made up of many kinds of immigrants today who are very against this ban. The ban caused a major issue for visa holders, international students studying in the U.S and outside, and those with legal green cards, many of whom were detained at airports and not allowed to reenter the U.S. Many cities broke out in protests after hearing this news. The New York Times has a great article which sums up exactly what the executive order does and information we do not yet know of yet (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/29/us/trump-refugee-ban-muslim-executive-order.html ). NPR also lets us take a look at the full text of this executive order, it can be found at ( http://www.npr.org/2017/01/31/512439121/trumps-executive-order-on-immigration-annotated).

I picked this topic because I identify as a Muslim immigrant. I am from Pakistan and although this ban does not affect my country directly, my religion unites all of us making it hard to see people wronged. Everyone in my family is a citizen except for my mother who holds a valid green card. We are all going overseas this summer for a wedding, a happy event, but it got me thinking about what would have happened if my mother was from one of those seven countries. Would she even be allowed back into the country? Would this ban have split up my family? These are some of the reasons I chose this topic.

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Stack, Liam. “Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration: What We Know and What We Don’t.”NY Times. The New York Times, 29 Jan. 2017. Web. 11 Feb. 2017.

“Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration, Annotated.” NPR. NPR, n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2017.